Jinns or genies

Jinns or genies

Jinns or genies

Jinn or genies, Arabic: الجن‎ al-Jinn, singular الجني al-Jinnī) are spiritual creatures in Islam and Arabic folklore. They are in the Qur’an and other Islamic texts and inhabit an unseen world in dimensions beyond the visible universe of humans.

 

Throughout Arabian lore, there are different types of jinn; although the Qur’an mentions only three: Marid, ‘Ifrit, and Jinn. Other names include jann, ghoul, shaitans, hinn, nasnas, shiqq, si’lat, and a host of others. The names above vary depending on the region in the Middle Eastern country. Some of the best-known jinn are:

 

In Arabic folklore and common mythology, a Marid (Arabic: مارد‎ mārid), is a large and powerful jinn. Marids are mentioned in pre-Islamic Arabian mythology and inside the One Thousand and One Nights alongside the Jinn in the story of The Fisherman and the Jinni. The term marid is still used in Arabic to refer to giants.

Powerful DJinn/Jinn That Will Change Your Life

 

Marids are often described as the most powerful type of jinn, having especially great powers. They are the most proud as well. Like every jinn, they have free will yet could be compelled to perform chores. According to folklore, they also have the ability to grant wishes to mortals, but that usually requires battle, imprisonment, rituals, or just a great deal of flattery. The Bahamut, the giant fish in the Qu’ran, is an example of a non-humanoid form of this particular Jinn.

Together, the Jinn, humans and angels make up the three sapient creations of God. The Qur’an mentions that the Jinn are made of a smokeless and “scorching fire”, but also physical in nature, being able to interact physically with people and objects and likewise be acted upon. Like human beings, the Jinn can also be good, evil, or neutrally benevolent and hence have freewill like humans and unlike angels. The Jinn are mentioned frequently in the Qurʾan, and the 72nd sura is titled Sūrat al-Jinn.